York Career Development Listen to Madeleine York on:
Effective Communication in the Workplace
as a featured guest on 90.1 FM - KPFT


Email Newsletter icon, E-mail Newsletter icon, Email List icon, E-mail List icon Sign up for The Leadership Coach Newsletter

Career Coaching | Executive Coaching

↑ Grab this Headline Animator



 Subscribe in a reader


Links

Archives

Friday, January 30, 2009

Leadership Training

A recently publicized set of events revealed that the people, who had experienced workplace stress and negative emotional behavior were to receive a day of ?leadership training? in an effort to correct the situation. Whether the term is an oxymoron or not, the truth is that leadership cannot be trained in a person, like so much historical or mathematical knowledge is disseminated, because leaders become leaders as the result of a desire to make the lives of the people they lead happier and more productive. Leaders are people who have the ability to create a vision for an organization or a team and then to motivate those involved to achieve the objectives associated with the vision.

Consequently, leadership skills, such as integrity of character, can be developed over time in a context in which the ?leader? is exposed to desirable experiences that form the foundation of a person?s ability to build trust and empower those who are lead. A good case in point from Good to Great is Jim Collin?s examples of Level 5 leaders, who are totally committed to the success of the organization and not to their personal self-aggrandizement.

The significance of character is so impactful that people, like Herb Kelleher of Southwest Airlines require that character be paramount in the hiring process, with skill development to follow. A personal acquaintance, who served as a union mechanic for eighteen years, was trained to acquire the skills for a job usually requiring a degree in electrical engineering. While this person has only a GED, his character caused others to take their time to ensure his success in achieving the necessary certification.

Leaders subordinate their ego needs to develop the self-esteem of those they lead because their joy comes from knowing that their ideas and commitment are directly related to the success of an individual, a team or an organization

Thursday, January 29, 2009

The Psychological Recession

Writing in the August ?08 issue of Trends E-Magazine, Judith Bardwick had this to say, ?Today, many employees are so worried about becoming victims of downsizing, outsourcing and off-shoring that they work in a state of perpetual insecurity. And because they feel their employers no longer care about them, they have stopped caring about their jobs.? Superimpose on what was written several months ago, with what is going on in the financial world now and you can double or triple this sense of anxiety and fear.
The truth is that people don?t work effectively when they are afraid. Added to that is the sense that they are not valued and the situation becomes magnified. Barwick goes on the say, ?When employees are perceived as a cost and not a resource, when they are treated like as a liability and not an asset, when no one seems to know or care that they are there, people don?t work well and they don?t stay.? And what is the cost of turn-over? What ever it is, it is much higher than the cost associated with treating people with dignity and respect.
Looking ahead, Bardwick makes this suggestion, ?Business leaders must identify their top performers?the ones who are crucial to the company?s success both today and in the future?and they make a visible meaningful commitment to them.? Of course, there are few guarantees in a world with great financial, social and political ambiguity; however, a little encouragement and expression of appreciation goes a long way to ensuring people that you truly have their best interests at heart.
Even small manifestations of commitment can have significant impact on performance, productivity and profitability.

Monday, January 05, 2009

The Psychological Recession

Writing in the August 2008 issue of Trends E-Magazine, Judith Bardwick had this to say, "Today, many employees are so worried about becoming victims of downsizing, outsourcing and off-shoring that they work in a state of perpetual insecurity. And because they feel their employers no longer care about them, they have stopped caring about their jobs." Superimpose on what was written several months ago, with what is going on in the financial world now and you can double or triple this sense of anxiety and fear.

The truth is that people don?t work effectively when they are afraid. Added to that is the sense that they are not valued and the situation becomes magnified. Barwick goes on the say, "When employees are perceived as a cost and not a resource, when they are treated like as a liability and not an asset, when no one seems to know or care that they are there, people don?t work well and they don?t stay." And what is the cost of turn-over? What ever it is, it is much higher than the cost associated with treating people with dignity and respect.

Looking ahead, Bardwick makes this suggestion, "Business leaders must identify their top performers?the ones who are crucial to the company?s success both today and in the future?and they make a visible meaningful commitment to them." Of course, there are few guarantees in a world with great financial, social and political ambiguity; however, a little encouragement and expression of appreciation goes a long way to ensuring people that you truly have their best interests at heart.

Even small manifestations of commitment can have significant impact on performance, productivity and profitability.


York Career Development, Inc.
3307 Northland Drive,
Suite 280
Austin, TX 78731
Phone
512-502-8258

Home | Services | Entheos Press
Articles | The Company | Life Planning
Web Departments | Executive Coaching | Contact Us
York Career Development, Inc.
7457 Harwin,
Suite 225
Houston, Texas 77036
Phone
866-502-8258
Mobile
512-656-8239